Tomb of the Unknowns

Honoring Our HeroesHonoring Our Heroes, originally uploaded by sweetspot@f8.

Tomb of the Unkowns also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Located in Arlington National Cemetery, it is a monument dedicated to American servicemen/women who have died without their remains being identified.

The “Unknown Soldier” of World War I is a recipient of the Medal of Honor, the Victoria Cross, and several other foreign nations’ highest service awards. The U.S. Unknown Soldiers who were interred afterwards are also recipients of the Medal of Honor, presented by the U.S. presidents who presided over their funerals.

On November 11, 1920 the United Kingdom had buried one of its unknown warriors in Westminster Abbey. The same day, France buried the Unknown Soldier beneath the Arc de Triomphe, and on March 4, 1921, the United States Congress approved the burial of an unidentified American soldier from World War I in the plaza of the new Memorial Amphitheater. The tomb’s design was selected in a competition won by architect Lorimer Rich. The sculpture was by Thomas Hudson Jones.
The white marble sarcophagus has a flat-faced form and is relieved at the corners and along the sides by neo-classical pilasters, or columns, set into the surface. The stone was quarried in Marble, Colorado. Sculpted into the east panel which faces Washington, D.C., are three Greek figures representing Peace, Victory, and Valor. Inscribed on the western panel of the Tomb are the words:

“HERE RESTS IN HONORED GLORY AN AMERICAN SOLDIER KNOWN BUT TO GOD ”

The six wreaths carved into the north and south of the tomb represent six major battles of World War I: Ardenne, Belleau Wood, Chateau-Thierry, Meuse-Argonne, Oisiu-Eisue and Somme.[5]
The Tomb sarcophagus was placed above the grave of the Unknown Soldier of World War I. West of this grave are the crypts of unknowns from World War II (south) and Korea (north). Between the two lies a crypt which once contained an unknown from Vietnam (middle). His remains were identified in 1998 as First Lieutenant Michael Blassie and removed. Those three graves are marked with white marble slabs flush with the plaza. from Wikipedia.

Taken with a Canon Rebel XS with a Sigma 70-300mm APO DG Macro Lens
Exposure: 0.005 sec (1/200)
Aperture: f/5.6
Focal Length: 168 mm
ISO Speed: 100
Exposure Program: Aperture-priority AE

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11 thoughts on “Tomb of the Unknowns

  1. Flickr: YannGar Photography

    This photo is a good sample in the flickr. It is awarded the flickr Award!

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  2. Flickr: romorga

    This photo is a good sample in the flickr. It is awarded the flickr Award!

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  3. Flickr: VDL SPORTS

    This photo is a good sample in the flickr. It is awarded the flickr Award!

    flickrAward (post1 – award 5)
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