Vignetting 

In photography and optics, vignetting (pronounced /vɪnˈjɛtˌɪŋ/) is a reduction of an image’s brightness or saturation at the periphery compared to the image centre. The word vignette, from the same root as vine, originally referred to a decorative border in a book. Later, the word came to be used for a photographic portrait which is clear in the centre, and fades off at the edges. A similar effect occurs when filming projected images or movies off a projection screen, the so-called hotspot, defining a cheap home-movie look where no proper telecine is used.

Although vignetting is normally unintended and undesired, it is sometimes purposely introduced for creative effect, such as to draw attention to the centre of the frame. A photographer may deliberately choose a lens which is known to produce vignetting. It can also be produced with the use of special filters or post-processing procedures.

From WikiPedia, the free encyclopedia.

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